Chinese Medicine Treatment of prostatitis

Chinese Medicine Treatment of prostatitis

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Image by Mubariz Mehdizadeh

Prostatitis is a common condition in male adults. To understand the disease, first understand the location of the prostate. The prostate is an accessory gland of the male reproductive organs. Its shape is like a chestnut, which surrounds the upper end of the urethra and can be touched by fingers in the anal canal. The cause of prostatitis is mostly caused by prostatic hyperemia. A small number of patients may be caused by bacterial infection.

The main symptoms after prostatitis are frequent urination, urgency, dysuria, and white discharge from the urethra. Some patients experience pain in the perineum, lumbosacral region, rectum, spermatic cord, testis, or groin; they can even cause sexual dysfunction. A small number of patients have neurasthenia symptoms.

The diagnosis of prostatitis can be divided into acute and chronic. Acute cases often have high fever, chills, frequent urination, urgency, and urinary tract infections are very similar, patients have no low back pain and tenderness at this time; such as rectal examination can be found in the prostate enlargement and tenderness, and urine routine examination there is only a small amount of white blood cells; in this case, a prostatic fluid test will reveal a large number of pus cells. Chronic prostatitis is more common in m men in their 30s and 40s. The lesions can change from acute to chronic, and most patients have no acute phase.

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Dioscoreae Hypoglaucae

Traditional Chinese medicine scholars from the Tang Dynasty to the Song, Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasties generally believe that the main symptoms of prostatitis belong to the category of gonococcal disease, which is caused by kidney deficiency 腎虛, bladder heat dampness 膀胱濕熱, gasification and loss of water 氣化失司, and unfavorable Urethra passage 水道不利. And put forward the principle of treatment: promote urination, clearing evil heat, and boost circulation. According to the above principles, Luciferous Traditional Medicine Clinic practitioner has treated the disease for many years based on the [Medical Mindfulness 醫學心悟] by Ching Chung Ling 程鐘齡, the “Rhizoma Dioscoreae Hypoglaucae Decoction for Clearing Turbid Urine 萆薢分清飲”:

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Rhizoma Dioscoreae Hypoglaucae

Rhizoma Dioscoreae Hypoglaucae 萆薢 12 grams
Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae白朮 12 grams
Semen Plantaginis 車前子 12 grams
Poria 茯苓 12 grams
Rhizoma Acori Graminei 石菖蒲 5 grams
Cortex Phellodendri 黃柏 10 grams
Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae 丹蔘 10 grams
Plumula Nelumbinis 蓮子心15 grams


Place all the above ingredients into a clay pot then add 750ml of water, boil to reduce to approximate 250ml of decoction, one 250ml dose daily, 16 days as per one treatment course. Generally, two courses of treatment are needed.

The advantage of this herbal medicine combination is that it clears the turbidity and Qi stagnation; it has no negative adverse effects. Acute and chronic prostatitis can be taken. During the treatment, the patient should not consume spicy fried foods; coffee and alcohol should also be avoided.

The Herb in Chinese Medicine for older adults

The Herb in Chinese Medicine for older adults

Huang Jing and meat broth

Herbal medicine Huang Jing - The Herb in Chinese Medicine for older adults
Rhizoma Polygonati (黃精 Huang Jing), the Qi tonifying herb

The older adults should consider use in the winter tonic [Huang Jing and meat broth] “延年祛病, 莫若黃精 (longevity and immunity, must use Huang Jing)” This is the health adage in the era of 唐朝Tang Dynasty (618 – 907A.D.). In the winter, [Huang Jing Tang] Soup of Huang Jing is tonic, and there is the merit of longevity and immunity. The prescription is as follows:

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The original plant of Rhizoma Polygonati 黃精 (Huang Jing)


黃精 (Huang Jing) Rhizoma Polygonati 15 grams
黃蓍 (Huang Qi) Radix Astragali 10 grams
枸杞子 (Gou Qi Zi) Fructus Lycii 5 grams
山萸肉 (Shan Zhu Yu) Fructus Corni 5 grams
Lean pork meat (or Chicken meat) 50 – 100 grams
Use reasonable amount of water (approximate 1 Litre), boiled soup, seasoning with little amount of salt only.


The Huang Jing (or yellow essence by direct translation) in Chinese medicine point of views it is sweet and neutral but not dry. It functions to tonifies the Spleen Qi and nourishes the Spleen Yin; and Nourish Yin in general and moistens the Lungs. In recent years, the medical literature reported its pharmacological effects as:
Firstly, it is nourishing and strong
Secondly, it has an inhibitory effect on hyperglycaemia
Thirdly, it helps improvement of atherosclerosis and fatty liver
Fourthly, improve high blood pressure
Fifthly, inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Salmonella typhi, and skin fungus


It has been used for the treatment of atherosclerosis, hypertension and premature aging in the older adults for many years in Luciferous Traditional Medicine Acupuncture Clinic.

Herbal medicine for gut health

Herbal medicine for gut health

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, gut health is an integral component of living a healthy and balanced life. However, we are seeing an increased number of new patients seeking support in regards to a variety of digestive issues.

Often, patients seek the support of a Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioner after trying various Western treatments to which they have experienced little to no success – and in some cases, even experience an increase in their symptoms.

A powerful alternative, herbal medicine strives to heal the body naturally by eliminating the root cause and looking at all of the different elements that may be contributing to the digestive upset. 

During consultations, Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners prescribe a unique blend of herbs to combat your individual symptoms, and closely monitor the effects, tweaking the prescription where necessary to ensure each patient achieves the very best results.

Here are some of the common ingredients that may be included in your prescription.

Geng Mi (Semen Oryzae)

A rice extract powder which can help to soothe the stomach and manage thirst, diarrhea and fatigue.

Ji Nei Jin (Endothelium Corneum Gigeriae Galli)

A chicken extract used to promote digestion and remove stagnant food as well as aid in eliminating nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, moving undigested foods, and severe indigestion.

Shan Zha (Fructus Crataegi)

A berry extract that is known for its ability to reduce food stagnation as well as it’s cardiovascular benefits.

Mai Ya (Fructus Hordei Germinatus)

A barley extract most commonly used to promote the digestion of carbohydrates and starches.

Chen Pi (Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae)

An extract made from orange or mandarin peel that is used to regulate the whole digestive system and support the spleen and stomach, while reducing nausea, vomiting, belching, abdominal fullness, and distention or pain.

To find out more about improving your gut health with herbal medicine, contact us on (03) 9576 8538 or book a consultation online

How screens could be stopping you from getting a good nights sleep

How screens could be stopping you from getting a good nights sleep

For many of us, screens have become an important part of our everyday lives – but mounting evidence suggests that utilising them to close to bedtime could be wreaking havoc on our sleep patterns.

According to sleep experts, watching television, looking at our phones or using a computer before bed can affect our sleep in the following ways.

Disrupts sleep cycle

One of the most important things to be aware of when looking at screens before bed is their ability to disrupt the bodies sleep cycle, also known as the circadian rhythm. Essentially, the blue light emitted from screens can restrict the bodies ability to produce melatonin, which is the hormone responsible for regulating the circadian rhythm, thereby making it harder to fall into a deep, restful sleep.

Encourages alertness

Rather than preparing you to drift off to sleep, using screens before bed typically encourages alertness and trick your brain into thinking you need to stay awake. While it may seem harmless, an exciting movie or an interesting article can stimulate your brain more than you might realise, and ultimately cause you to stay awake longer than you need to. 

Unexpected wake up calls

In fact, mobile phones in particular have become such a key component in our everyday routines that many people rely on them as their morning alarm, meaning they tend to keep them on the nightstand or beside the bed. However, forgetting to switch your phone to silent can be seriously problematic to your sleep, as unexpected calls, messages and notifications can wake you during the night.

While there’s no need to give up screens altogether, we’re sure that we could all benefit from cutting down our screen time – and making a conscious effort to put away the gadgets at least 30 minutes before going to bed. For further support on living a healthy and balanced lifestyle, contact us on (03) 9576 8538 or book a consultation online.

Treating eczema with Traditional Chinese Medicine

Treating eczema with Traditional Chinese Medicine

 

Eczema… It’s either itchy, painful or itchy and painful at the same time. While not life-threatening, it’s an uncomfortable condition that for some can even be a source of embarrassment. 

Affecting 1 in 3 Australians at some point in their lives, many eczema sufferers are prescribed medicines such as topical or oral corticosteroids, antihistamines, and immunosuppressants. However, these treatments can often come with a long list of side effects, and usually aren’t recommended to be used long-term. Fortunately, there is a way to combat this condition naturally. 

While Western medicine considers eczema to be an allergic condition, and aims to control the symptoms caused by an imbalance in the immune system, Traditional Chinese Medicine sees eczema as a symptom of another illness – and aims to treat the root of the cause. 

To treat eczema with Traditional Chinese Medicine, you will typically encounter a mixture of acupuncture and herbal medicine. 

Acupuncture

With acupuncture, your practitioner will work to activate the body’s natural healing processes where it is needed most. In the case of eczema, they will seek to reduce stress, as well as ensuring that the spleen and liver are functioning properly, you have good blood circulation and more. 

Herbal medicine 

As part of your herbal medicine treatment, your practitioner will help you to identify foods that can trigger a flare up and again, reduce stress. Once these physical and mental triggers have been removed, the next step would involve a mix of Chinese herbs. Some herbs that you may encounter are to improve spleen health are cablin patchouli and fortune eupotorium, and others used to treat liver health are Chinese thorowax root, tree peony bark and liquorice root. 

Are you an eczema sufferer that has tried Traditional Chinese Medicine to help alleviate symptoms? If so, let us know how it worked out for you in the comments below! To book a consultation, call us on (03) 9576 8538 or book online today.